How a ghostwriter helps when you struggle to speak up

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How a ghostwriter helps when you struggle to speak up

If you’ve ever had trouble speaking up...

... and telling someone that you didn’t love something they did or said, then this post is for you! We’re talking about what you have to take responsibility for when you work with a ghostwriter. But it’s not all doom and gloom, because the writer has responsibilities too. Understanding what the ghostwriter is responsible for will help if you’ve ever struggled to say what you really think.

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I help entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. I write their book their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

This week my baby boy turned one. We had a big Cookie Monster-themed birthday party (there's a pic of the cupcakes I made below) and this morning, I took him to the doctor’s for his 12 month checkup.

 
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The doctor gave me this leaflet called Raising a Healthy Eater. It outlines the parents’s responsibilities: deciding where the child eats, when they eat, and what they eat. And it details the child’s responsibilities, which are deciding whether to eat, or not to eat, and how much to eat.

 
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This reminded me…

And this reminded me of a conversation I had with a potential client last week. She talked about how she’d previously worked with another ghostwriter and had felt like the voice, the style of the writing, had got away from her a bit. It ended up being a little different to what she wanted.

I sensed she was disappointed with herself for not taking control of the situation, speaking up, and saying what she really thought. She was a super nice woman, and she explained that in her work, she has to accommodate different voices all the time. She ended up applying that skill to this situation, when really she should’ve stuck firm to her own voice.

What really grabbed my heartstrings was when she asked if I thought she’d been stupid for letting that situation get out of hand.

Was it all on her?

I told her that, as a grown up investing in a work project, she does have a responsibility to speak up. After all, no writer can read someone’s mind. But I also explained that—as the professional providing a service—the ghostwriter has a responsibility to create an environment that encourages the client to speak up.

So it wasn’t all on her. And she certainly wasn’t stupid for wanting to be nice to her writer!

I’ve been ghostwriting marketing stuff and speeches and scripts for over a decade, but I started working for myself in 2014. And that was when I discovered one of the best and most difficult things about choosing your own clients...

You get to work with lovely people. It’s so fantastic to have wonderful clients. But the challenge is that often, these lovely people want to be nice to me! They want to tell me my work is great. Which is kinda cool!

But the only way to improve a piece of writing is to be critical of it.

What I discovered early on

So early on, I discovered I had to work hard to really encourage these nice people to be critical of the work I was producing. Only then can we address those criticisms, edit the writing, and make it better.

Just like parents and children both have responsibilities at mealtimes, the client and writer both have responsibilities in the creation process. And, just like the parent has to teach the child that they have control over aspects of eating, as the professional in this relationship, I have to teach my clients that they have a responsibility to contribute to the success of their project. 

Then I have to take it a step further and create a safe space where they feel encouraged to do that.

So there we have it. It’s your responsibility to speak up when you work with a ghostwriter. It’s the ghostwriter’s responsibility to create a safe and encouraging environment that allows you to say what you really think. Then, you can work together to create something you’ll be proud of.

Want to take responsibility?

If you want to take responsibility for improving your own writing, enter your email below and you’ll get 15 writing tips from today’s top entrepreneurs. I’ll also send you more cool stuff about writing for your business every week.

See you next time.

 Want to write better for your business? Get 15 writing tips from today's top entrepreneurs, from Green Goose Ghostwriting.

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Learning from the best non-fiction books

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Learning from the best non-fiction books

Writing Lessons from Unshakeable by Tony Robbins

Tony Robbins, one of the world’s biggest life and business coaches, says that one of the shortcuts to success is modelling others who are already doing what you want to do. So if you want to write a book that sells millions, inspires countless people to improve their lives, and catapults your career, let’s model an author who’s done just that: Tony Robbins. Today I’m looking at the writing lessons we can learn from his awesome book, Unshakeable.

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I help entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. I write their book their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

Unshakeable by Tony Robbins with Peter Mallouk is a step-by-step playbook to transform your financial life, and it’s designed to be a quick-and-easy version of Tony's mammoth New York Times bestselling book Money: Master the Game.

My husband and I are pretty new to talking responsibility for our investments, planning for retirement, and all that boring grown up stuff. So we learned a lot from this book!

And part of why we learned so much was because this book is so brilliantly written. It’s clear, easy to follow, engaging (which is saying something for a book with a whole chapter on taxes). And there were three key lessons I took from this great writing.

Lesson 1: Write like you speak

Okay, I listened to this on audiobook so it literally sounded like Tony Robbins! (He narrates part of it plus there are two other narrators.)

But he writes like he speaks. He uses the same language, phrasing, contractions, and jokes that he uses in real life. If you’ve heard any of his interviews or seen his Netflix documentary, you’ll know what he sounds like. And his writing “sounds” just the same. 

People love learning from Tony Robbins because he has this infectious energy and a compelling way of being that draws people in. If he tried to write “properly” like we’re taught in school, using full sentences, never starting a sentence with a conjunction, whatever, he would lose that magic that makes it his voice. He’d lose the unique energy that people are attracted to.

And people will be attracted to your unique voice, if you just quit hiding it behind trying to sound smart. So, talk normal. And write like you talk.

Lesson 2: Repeat and repeat again

I once heard Oprah say that the key to a good speech is to tell people what you’re going to tell them, then tell them it, then tell them what you told them.

So you start by saying, “Today I’m going to tell you about x, y, z,” and you give them a quick summary. Then you tell them your points in more detail. Then you end by summarizing, again, what you just told them. So you say, “I hope you now understand x, y, and z.”

That’s great advice because, unfortunately, we all need to hear things multiple times before the message sinks in.

We all need to hear things multiple times before the message sinks in.

We all need to hear things multiple times before the message sinks in.

Just kidding.

But that’s what Tony’s book does beautifully. Every chapter starts with a summary. In this section we’re going to talk about… whatever. Then he gets into the meat of the subject. Then he ends each chapter saying, “You now know that …” and he summarizes it again. 

You may think it’s a waste of words or patronizing to go over things more than once, but it serves your reader well. It guides them through the learning process so they can retain the information you’re sharing. And after all, what’s the point of telling people something if they’re not going to be able to remember it?

So repeat, and repeat again.

Lesson 3: Face the objections

There’s a moment in this book where Tony talks about taxes. He introduces the subject, then says something like, “I can see you rolling your eyes and going to sleep. But don’t! He’s why you should pay attention to taxes.”

He acknowledges that taxes are boring as all hell, calls out the reader for rolling their eyes (in a nice way), and faces the objection head on.

The objection is, “I don’t want to read about this because it’s boring.” He straight up recognizes this and tells us why we should read anyway.

If you don’t mention the objections, they don’t go away. Your reader won’t forget why they aren’t totally on-board with what you’re saying. The objections just become more engrained.

It’s better to talk about them head on and take the opportunity to change the reader’s mind. Maybe you will change their mind, maybe you won’t. But you definitely won’t if you ignore the objections.

So there they are...

So there are our three writing lessons from Unshakeable by Tony Robbins: write like you speak, repeat your message again and again, and face the objections.

If you want more advice like this to improve your writing, enter your email below and you’ll get 15 writing tips from today’s top entrepreneurs. I’ll also send you more cool stuff about writing for your business every week.

See you next time.

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P.S. Wondering why there's no video this week?

I'm sick. Again. Not too bad, but I do sound like Darth Vader. Which I guess is appropriate since May the Fourth will be here soon. (May the Fourth also happens to be my birthday. Coolest date of the year by far.)

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Think no one cares about your book idea?

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Think no one cares about your book idea?

Think again

More publishers want non-fiction books! That’s the latest trend being reported this month by the bigwig industry commentators. If you’re sitting there thinking no one would be interested in your non-fiction book idea, I’m going to tell you what this news means for you.

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I help entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. I write their book their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

This month the 47th annual London Book Fair took place in, well, London. It’s a pretty big deal in the world of traditional publishing. They describe it as the global marketplace for rights negotiation and the sale and distribution of content. Basically, it’s where all the top dogs in publishing get together, make book deals, learn, and give out some fancy awards.

There are folks who track the number of book deals done at and in preparation for the London Book Fair. They report on those deals, and we get an idea of what types of books traditional publishers are interested in. It’s an insight into what’s hot in the publishing industry right now. 

Publishers Lunch, which is one of the big industry commentators, said, “… the most notable trend from this London Book Fair dealmaking season is the surge of big deals — and ‘major’ deals in particular — for nonfiction.” The was also talked about by The Creative Penn, The Hot Sheet, and Publishing Perspectives.

So what are they saying? 

They’re saying there were more big non-fiction book deals this spring than in the same time period last year. That confidence in non-fiction books is a great sign for anyone who wants to write their own non-fiction book.

Am I saying it’s now easy to get a traditional publishing deal for a non-fiction book?

Unfortunately not.

There are still lots of hurdles to jump through (which is part of the reason why self-publishing is such a popular option for entrepreneurs). 

But I am saying that, if you thought there would be no interest in your non-fiction book idea, it’s time to revisit that assumption. 

Whether you choose to self-publish or pursue a traditional publisher, the demand for non-fiction books is, if anything, increasing.

You haven't missed the bandwagon!

I’ll talk more about why it’s worth answering that demand with your own book in an upcoming video. But for now, be assured that you haven’t missed the bandwagon. People really do want to publish—and read—good non-fiction books. And yours could be one of them!

If you want to improve your non-fiction writing, enter your email below and you’ll get 15 writing tips from today’s top entrepreneurs. I’ll also send you more cool stuff about writing for your business every week.

See you next time.

 Want to write better for your business? Get 15 writing tips from today's top entrepreneurs, from Green Goose Ghostwriting.

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The real truth about why ghostwriting matters

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The real truth about why ghostwriting matters

I went back and forth on whether or not to share this today

I’d planned on doing a “lessons from the best non-fiction books” post. But this came to me and I thought, if I don’t post this now, I may chicken out and never share it. It feels a little intimidating to talk about this because it’s close to my heart but I think it’s important because, if you’ve been struggling with the idea of writing a book, it might just give you the encouragement you need. It’ll also give you a bit of insight into why ghostwriting really matters to me.

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I help entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. I write their book their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

If you’ve been following me, you’ll know I’m taking Jenny Shih’s business coaching course, Make It Work Online. This week’s lesson was all about fear and a success mindset. 

It made me consider the fears I have around my own business ….

I don’t feel a ton of fear around the actual work. I always feel concerned with doing a good job because I’m conscious that someone has put their trust in me. But doing the work itself is where I feel most comfortable. It energizes me. 

If I do have fear, it’s more around running the business. Of course, a big part of that is because I want to provide for my family. I want to have the money to take my son on adventures and do fun things together. But I realized there’s something else going on there, too. Something even deeper.

It’s important to me to be successful because I think what I do is important. And when I say that aloud, my inner devil pops up on my shoulder and says, “Ha! You’re just a writer. Your not a doctor, you don’t run a charity, you don’t contribute to society.” Whatever.

But despite not being a doctor or ending world hunger, I think what I do is important for one important reason ….

Everyone has the right to speak

Let me say it again: Everyone has the right to speak.

I don’t think we’re entitled to be heard. There are a few exceptions; a democratic government, a committed romantic relationship. But for the most part, you don’t deserve to be heard. It’s not your human right to be listened to.

But you are entitled to speak. It’s your right to say what you want to say.

You don’t have to earn this right

You don’t have to have worked in your industry for decades, or served a certain number of clients, or have a multi million-dollar business. Some of those things help with getting heard, but none of those benchmarks are required for you to have the right to say what you want to say.

You can probably tell that I’m not American (I’m English and I live in Canada), but a lot of you watching are in the States and this right, as you know, is recognized in your constitution: the constitutional right to free speech.

Even if you’re not in the States and your government doesn’t have an equivalent, it doesn’t matter. Because this is a human right.

And every human on this earth is equal. So we all have this right. We all should be able to speak when we want to.

The problem—and the beauty—of this world is that, although we’re all equal, we’re not all the same

That means some people are great at speaking what’s on their mind. They have no qualms about writing a book, saying what they want, and sharing their words with the world.

But others aren’t like that. They have that imposter syndrome, thinking, “Who am I to say this?” Or they wonder what it says about their ego if they write a book. 

Some people are okay with that stuff because they know what they have to say is important and even if it wasn’t, they know they have the right to say it anyway. But they get frustrated with the actual writing. It’s not their forte. They can think it all through but writing it is just really hard. 

Or they don’t have the time between earning enough to support their family, trying to serve others, taking their kids to soccer practice, making dinner, the odd Netflix date with their partner ….

If you’re not a naturally gifted writer, or are wrestling with the mindset stuff, or are busy doing important things in your life, you still have the same right to speak as everyone else.

The fact that we’re all born equal is something that I feel deeply. We all have an equal right to speak, and I don’t think it’s okay when someone doesn’t get to do that just because writing isn’t their thing, or because they’ve been busy contributing to the world, their family, in another way.

That’s why I’m drawn to ghostwriting

It sounds stupid, but it’s my little part for equality. It’s my small way of balancing the scales for people who want to share their words with the world but struggle to do it alone.

For sure there are other, bigger ways to work toward equality and I plan to step-up and do more of that. But this feels right. It feels good to help people say the things they feel in their heart but haven’t been able to get down on the page. It feels right to help people speak to a wider audience when they feel drawn to do that.

We can’t completely control whether people listen, but we can control our own actions. And we can choose to exercise our right to speak, even if it doesn’t come naturally, even if we need support from others to do it.

We have the right to speak. I hope remembering that encourages you to use your voice.

Want more confidence using your voice?

If you want to get 15 writing tips from today’s top entrepreneurs so you can feel more confident when you exercise that right, sign up below and I’ll send them over to you. You’ll also get more cool stuff about writing for your business each week.

I’ll see you next time.

 Want to write better for your business? Get 15 writing tips from today's top entrepreneurs, from Green Goose Ghostwriting.

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The surprising first step to writing a book

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The surprising first step to writing a book

(even if you don’t know what your book is about)

If you have some rough, kinda fuzzy thoughts about writing a book for your business, but you can’t seem to get any further with this idea, this video is for you. We’re talking about the very first step you should take to write your book, even if you don’t really know what your book is about yet!

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I work with entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. I write their book their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

Last week I launched my new service to help people take the first step in writing their book, but I want to take a beat to talk about what that first step is, why it will help you, and how you can do it with or without me.

If you’ve been putting your book on the back-burner because you don’t know where to start, it can be frustrating. Maybe you haven’t even tried to write anything yet. Or you sat down to write and it felt impossible. 

Well, let me ask you something… 

Can you sum up your book in a few sentences?

If not, that’s your problem. 

You’re likely trying to do too much, or talk to too many people, or share too many ideas. And that’s because you’re a generous person! You want to help people and share your message, and you know so much about your subject. And that’s wonderful!

But it makes writing a book feel like a behemoth task. 

You need to figure out exactly what direction you want your book to take. You need to know where you’re going with it.

Otherwise, it’s like trying to achieve business goals, but not knowing what those goals are. You can’t do anything with that!

That’s why writing a synopsis is the first step to writing a book. 

A synopsis is a summary of what your book is about. It sounds too simple, right?

And sure, not everyone needs it. If you’re off writing away without a synopsis, great. But I’m talking to the people who know they have the knowledge for a book, but just can’t get the damn thing going.

Take some time to create a few short paragraphs that summarize what your book will be about.

This is the first step to writing your book.

Once you get into the writing, your direction may change slightly. And that’s okay! A synopsis isn’t a cage that you have to stay in. It’s something to aim for. It’s what will help you get started.

Now, writing a synopsis takes some work; a lot of people struggle to condense their ideas down. It will pay off because it’ll make the writing process easier, but it is work. That’s why I created a one-off session to help people with it. You can find out more about that here.

But even if you’re not ready to get help, I encourage you to try this on your own. And I’d love to hear how it goes. (Click here to tell me!)

Because you don’t need to stay stuck. You can take the first step, and your book can be more than just an idea.

I’ll see you next time.

 Want to write better for your business? Get 15 writing tips from today's top entrepreneurs, from Green Goose Ghostwriting.

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Something new for you

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Something new for you

I've been working behind the scenes ...

... on something I'm really excited about. But before I spill the beans, I want to ask you a few things:

  • Are you fed up of putting your book on the back-burner because you don’t know where to start?
     
  • Do you just want someone to clear the confusion and give you direction?
     
  • Are you ready to take the first step to making your book a reality?


If that sounds like you, I can help.

I’m offering a new package that will help you take that first step to writing your book. This 90-minute session will let you ditch the mental clutter that’s blocking your path to being a successful author.

It's not too overwhelming. It's a really effective way to get the confidence and direction to start making real progress on your book.

Best of all, when we're done, you'll have a professionally-written synopsis that will encapsulate the contents of your book, the energy of your voice, and your unique promise to your audience. You'll also have an action plan PDF, giving you a clear path to take your idea from a synopsis to a ready-to-publish manuscript.

With these in hand, you can finally write the book that will change lives, snag you speaking engagements, and level-up your business.

This new package is called Breakthrough Synopsis: The First Step to Writing Your Book.

If you want to get your ideas un-jumbledbe confident in what you’ll include in (and what you’ll leave out of) your book, and finally be able to move forward, I can help get you there.

Click here to learn about the Breakthrough Synopsis: The First Step to Writing Your Book.

And if you have any questions, click here to email me. I love chatting about this stuff!

See you next time.

 Want to write better for your business? Get 15 writing tips from today's top entrepreneurs, from Green Goose Ghostwriting.

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Are you ready to level-up your business?

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Are you ready to level-up your business?

How can you know?

Sharing your message through a book can help you level-up your business. But how do you know if you’re ready to level-up? I’ve got three tips to help you figure it out.

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I work with entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. But they feel frustrated that writing takes forever and the words don’t sound like them. I write their book their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

Today is my husband’s two year anniversary of being in business for himself. He owns a renovations and construction company called Green Goose Renovations & Construction. (See the theme?!) And because he’s doing fairly well, our bookkeeper just recommended we incorporate the business.

We still have to talk to the lawyer about it, but it feels like a really big step up. And that feels a bit paralysing. It’s intimidating.

So it made me think… how do you know when it’s time to face that fear, get your butt in action, and step up your business, whether it’s calling the lawyer and changing your legal structure, or writing a book to reach a bigger audience?

 

1. You know your sh*t inside and out

If you’re still learning your trade or honing your process, you need to focus on that. You need to be confident you can make a difference in people’s lives, and comfortable with whatever you’re teaching or doing.

Once you know your sh*t inside and out, then you can switch gears to focus on growing your business.

 

2. You have steady sales

The second clue that you’re ready is if you have steady sales. Notice I didn’t say a certain dollar amount of sales. You could be steadily earning 10 bucks a month! Or steadily earning six figures. 

The point is if you’re sitting on a plateau, you need to boot yourself up off it. Unless you’re happy there, of course! But my guess is you’re not.

 

3. You’re feeling the itch

Lastly, you’re probably ready to grow your business if you’re feeling that itch. It’s an antsy, unsettled, unsatisfied feeling that you can’t shake. Maybe you’re confident you love what you do, but it isn’t quite revving you up like it used to. 

A new challenge might be exactly what you need to get your groove back.

Just be a bit careful with this one. Sometimes we want to distract ourselves when work feels hard or we’re learning new things and getting uncomfortable. 

So if you’re feeling this itch, go back to step one and check you know your stuff inside and out. That will help you spot if you’re feeling like this because you’re learning something new and it’s hard, or if it’s because it’s time to step up.

 

Want to improve your writing skills?

If you want to level-up your writing skills, stick your email in the space below and I’ll send you 15 writing tips from today’s top entrepreneurs. You’ll also get more cool stuff about writing for business as I come across it.

See you next time.

 Want to write better for your business? Get 15 writing tips from today's top entrepreneurs, from Green Goose Ghostwriting.

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Lessons from my summary...

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Lessons from my summary...

... and how they can help you

A few weeks ago I mentioned I was working on my summary—a few sentences that describe who I am, who I work with, and how I help them. (Find that video here.) Today I want to share my new summary, and some lessons I learned from working on it.

These lessons will, I hope, help if you've ever stumbled when trying to tell someone what you do for a living, or if you're wondering why work feels crummy sometimes.

Lesson 1: It’s okay if it’s fuzzy

If you trip over your tongue when you try to describe what you do, it’s okay. IT’S OKAY! You’ll want to figure it out; effectively communicating what you do is essential to your business success. But seriously, it’s okay if you find this hard! Many online, service-based business owners struggle.

So work on it, but don’t beat yourself up over it.

Lesson 2: Discomfort can be a good thing

When you’re doing hard brain work, it can feel uncomfortable. Trying to nail my summary made my brain hurt. I just wanted to run away, binge watch The Crown, and eat Cadbury’s Cream Eggs.

When work makes you feel crummy, it can be because you’re on the wrong path. But it could also just be because you’re doing something new and difficult.

The discomfort can be a good thing because it can be a sign you’re pushing yourself. Business coach Jenny Shih says the only way to get different results in business is to do different things. And that can be uncomfortable!

The good news is that there’s always something new to watch on Netflix when you’re done your uncomfortable work. (The bad news is they stop selling Cadbury’s Cream Eggs after easter.)

Lesson 3: Your work is ever-evolving

I started my freelance writing career ghostblogging. Then I moved into writing web copy. And now I’m ghostwriting books. As I’ve tuned more into what I enjoy and become braver, challenging myself to level-up my writing skills, I’ve changed direction.

It’s important to have a clear summary, but it’s also important to know it’s a living thing. I may well update it as I continue to work, grow my business, and improve myself.

But for now I feel really good about it. I’m confident it represents who I am, who I work with, and how I help them.

So what’s my summary?

I’m a ghostwriter for entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. But they’re frustrated that writing takes forever and the words don’t sound like them. I write their book in their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

 

If you want to level-up your writing skills, stick your email in the space below and I’ll send you 15 writing tips from today’s top entrepreneurs. (They're really good!) You’ll also get more cool stuff about writing for business as I come across it.

See you next time!

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P.S. Wondering why there’s no video this week?

I’m super sicko. Like, snot-dripping-out-of-my-nose-and-spluttering-over-the-keyboard sick. I don’t believe videos need to be perfect, but I also don’t want to subject you to that nastiness! Videos will resume when this god-damn cold clears off. Stay tuned.

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Coffee & Commas with Jodi Brandon

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Coffee & Commas with Jodi Brandon

It's my first guest blog post!

Editor and writing coach Jody Brandon shared one of my posts this week! She works with creative business owners and solopreneurs writing a book or ebook to scale their business, either through a traditional publisher or via self-publishing.

Most of her audience are into writing their books themselves, but sometimes folks ask her if they should work with a ghostwriter, so she shared this post on her blog.

In her weekly email, called Coffee & Commas, Jody compared ghostwriters to a cleaning person (which will make my husband laugh as I suck at cleaning). But her point is that they come in, wave their magic wand, and GET. THINGS. DONE.

I like that analogy! Here's to getting things done.

Oh, and go sign up for Jodi's Coffee & Commas emails. They're really interesting and packed full of actionable content that will help you finally move from idea to book. I'm a fan!

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Learning from the best non-fiction books

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Learning from the best non-fiction books

Lessons from
Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

If we want to write a successful non-fiction book—one that positions you as an authority in your niche, gets you speaking engagements, and inspires people—we should look to other successful books for inspiration. So I’m starting a series where we’ll learn from the best non-fiction books and use those lessons to improve our own writing. And today's book is one of my favourites!

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I help entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche, get speaking engagements, and inspire others. If you're frustrated that writing about your work takes forever and the words don’t sound like you, I can write your book for you, in your own voice, so you can finally level-up your business.

Better Than Before

We're starting this new series with Better Than Before: What I Learned About Making and Breaking Habits—To Sleep More, Quit Sugar, Procrastinate Less, and Generally Build a Happier Life by Gretchen Rubin.

I’ve always struggled with building good habits. I’m English so, y’know, I have bad teeth. Getting in the habit of using mouthwash after brushing my teeth is, honest to god, one of the hardest things I’ve ever tried to do. It’s pathetic. But there you go.

This book helped me understand why good habits are such a struggle for me, and what I can do about it. And I’m not the only one it’s helped. The book has 643 reviews on Amazon.com averaging 4.2 stars, and it hit a bunch of bestseller lists around the world.

So what can we learn from this book?

1. Know the one question your book answers.

Before the introduction there’s a note to the reader. The first line says, “Better Than Before tackles the question How do we change? One answer—by using habits." 

This book knows what it is. It knows the question it’s answering. That’s essential.

When you try to answer too many questions, or aren’t clear on the question you’re answering, you won’t be able to write a clear message.

2. Know who your book is talking to.

In her research for the book, Gretchen realized you can split the world into four main personality types, regarding how they respond to expectations and habit-building. At the beginning she names these four groups, and then she talks directly to them throughout the book.

She knows who she’s talking to.

You may not have a name for your audience like Gretchen does, but you must know who you’re talking to, so you can meet them where they’re at. So lesson two is...

3. Include personal stories.

Gretchen uses a lot of stories from her own life and family. I’m going to read you a very small example.

“On our flight home from a family trip, a chatty flight attendant remarked, as I declined to take anything from the snack basket, ‘After the holidays, a lot of people turn down the cookies and pretzels.’

“‘How long does that last?’ I asked.

“She smiled. ‘About as long as most New Year’s resolutions.’"

You might think you don’t have many good stories to include in your book. But I chose this example to prove your stories don’t have to be earth-shattering. 

The simple act of including your personal experiences, whether dramatic or not, will engage your audience and help them connect with you. That’s lesson three.

Next time ...

... we’ll talk more about ghostwriting, and we’ll look at lessons from another non-fiction book a few weeks after that.

In the meantime, if you want some writing tips from 15 of today’s top entrepreneurs, all gathered in one place for you, enter your email below and I’ll send that your way. I’ll also send you cool stuff about writing for your business as I come across it.

See you next time.

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Why work with a ghostwriter?

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Why work with a ghostwriter?

Frustration, time, and quality writing

If you’re struggling to write your book, you have a few options. You could just keep plugging away and hope for the best, or go to an editor, or hire a writing coach. Then there are ghostwriters. Why would you want to work with a ghostwriter?

 
 

I’m Liz Green, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I work with entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche, boost their speaking engagements, and inspire others. If you love talking about your work find the writing feels hard, I can help you write your book and level-up your business. 

Now, if you’ve been following my blog, you might’ve noticed my intro has been changing lately. It’s because I recently signed up for Jenny Shih’s business coaching course, and the first homework assignment was to work on our summary.

A summary is the statement that explains who you are, who you work with, and how you help them. Sometimes this is called an elevator pitch or an intro. Whatever you call it, you’ve probably worked on this in some guise in your own business. 

Part of nailing a really descriptive summary is succinctly saying why someone would want to work with you. So I've been thinking about this a lot, and I want to share with you the three reasons a successful entrepreneur would want to work with a ghostwriter…

Three reasons to work with a ghostwriter

  1. Frustration
    You're fed up of putting this project off, pushing it down the priority line, and not getting it done. You just want the damn book written, and you want to be done with the frustration around it.

    A ghostwriter will get the book done so your business can finally start benefitting from it.
     
  2. Time
    This might be where some of that frustration is coming from. You’re busy. Writing takes a lot of time.

    When you work with a ghostwriter, you have to invest some time so your writer can learn your story and tune into your voice. But it’s a fraction of the time you’d have to spend to write every word yourself. Using a ghostwriter, you can write your book and still have time to work on your business and live the life you want.
     
  3. Quality of writing
    Sometimes I forget to talk about this, but it’s a big deal. When you hire a professional writer, their quality of writing will be better than yours. (At least it bloody well should be!)

    Yes, they’re going to use your words and mannerisms. But it's their job to make it engaging, exciting, and make your audience feel something when they read your words. (And that something shouldn’t be boredom.)

I’m still trying to convey these ideas in a concise way. Getting those concepts down to a single sentence is a challenge but it’s a lot of fun for someone like me to geek out over words. 

Come back for the next video to see what I come up with. 

And if you want some writing tips from 15 of today’s top entrepreneurs, all gathered in one place for you, enter your email below, join my email list, and I’ll send that your way. 

See you next time.

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Are you making your audience feel okay?

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Are you making your audience feel okay?

Let's talk validation

Oprah tells us that everyone wants to know if they're doing okay. Well, your audience are asking that, too. Are you answering them? Are you making them feel okay?

 
 

 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that that build their credibility, demonstrate authority in their niche, and serve clients in a bigger way.

On Sunday I was on Facebook (as you do) and I came across a video of Oprah giving the Harvard Commencement Speech in 2013. In it, she mentions that she’s done over 35,000 interviews across a 25 year career and every interviewee, in some way, wants to be validated. They ask her, “Was that okay?” Here’s the video (it’s only three minutes):

 

 
 

 

I watched this video on Sunday and thought it was interesting that we all have this shared experience of wanting to be validated, asking if what we’re doing is okay, if what we’re saying makes sense.

Later that day, I had a client call with an awesome woman who knows her stuff inside and out. She speaks eloquently and engagingly, and she's writing what will be a great book. At the end of our call she said, “So how does this compare to other stuff you’ve worked on?" It was her way of saying, “Was this okay?"

Wow. Oprah knows everything about everyone. She’s amazing.

You see, everyone asks this question.

As entrepreneurs, we're often pushing ourselves into areas that feel slightly uncomfortable and we ask ourselves if we’re doing okay. But today I want to think about this from your audience’s perspective.

Whether you're writing a book, online content, podcast scripts, social media posts, or working directly with clients, you're talking to people who are going to wonder if they’re doing okay. 

I want you to address this

When you're talking to people, don’t shy away from this question. Address it as a chapter at the end of your book or a sentence at the end of your blog post. Because even if they're not saying it outright, they're likely thinking it. They want validation.

If you address it, you can put them at ease.

You’re doing okay.

Now, because you're here watching this video, I know that you want to learn. I know you’re interested in developing your writing skills. I know your heart and head are in the right place. Because of that, I can confidently say that you’re doing okay!

Whatever is going on in your world right now, you're doing okay with this stuff!

Want to keep learning?

If you want to keep learning and finding new ways to write better in your business, I have a new, shiny guide I can send you! It's 15 Writing Tips from Today's Top Entrepreneurs. Somehow I managed to get a little bit of an interview with some of the big names in the online business world, including Marie Forleo, Neil Patel, Jeff Goins, and Heather Crabtree, to name a few.

So stick your email address in the space below, and I’ll send that your way. See you next time!

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What's your superpower?

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What's your superpower?

What if you're not sure?

If you’re an entrepreneur, building your business around your superpower can help you be successful, and love what you’re doing. But what if you’re not sure what your superpower is?

 
 

 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that that build their credibility, demonstrate authority in their niche, and serve clients in a bigger way.

I get emails from a fellow ghostwriter called Sally Ann Miller. This week she sent out a link to a fun personality quiz. Now, personality quizzes can sound a little teenage-girly on the surface. But Sally talked about how personality quizzes can help you identify your superpower.

I can almost hear you thinking, “I don’t have any superpowers. Unless you count the ability to spend hours scrolling through Netflix without actually watching anything.”

But everyone has a superpower! It’s just a fun term to identify what you’re good at.

There’s a fun, free quiz

So I took the free quiz that Sally linked to. It’s from a company called Via Institute on Character. It’s free (though you can pay for a more in-depth report), and it took about five minutes. And I was blown away by how accurate the results were!

They have 24 character traits which they rank in the free quiz. They said my greatest personality strength was Perspective, which they define as being able to provide wise counsel to others, and having ways of looking at the world that make sense to oneself and others.

My second character strength was Social Intelligence, which is being aware of the motives and feelings of others and oneself, knowing what to do to fit into different social situations, and knowing what makes other people tick.

Third was Love of Learning, forth was Kindness, and fifth was good Judgement.

Rounding out my top 10 were:

  • Fairness, 
  • Prudence, 
  • Creativity, 
  • Curiosity, and 
  • Honesty.

I like having this insight because:

  1. It’s fun to get more insight into your personality!
     
  2. It explains why I’m drawn to ghostwriting as a career. 

    I find looking at the world through another person’s eyes fascinating, and ghostwriting lets me do that. 

    I also love knowing what makes others tick. I’ve always thought I’m good at ghostwriting because it’s easy for me to have empathy for whoever I’m working with. I think empathy is key to writing for someone else, but also making the world a more peaceful place!
     
  3. I know if I can play to my strengths in my business, I’ll be going with the tide instead of against it.

    That’s not to say if something is difficult, you shouldn’t do it. When you’re in business for yourself, there’s a lot of essential tasks that will push you outside your comfort zone. But if you focus the core of your business around your strengths, you’re more likely to be successful and love the work!

What are your superpowers?

I invite you to take this free personality quiz and see what your superpowers are. Then, you can ensure you’re building your business around those strengths, so you’re more likely to be successful and love your work.

Oh, and if you want to be nosey, my full personality report is below, so you can get to know me a bit better.

See you next time!

My personality report

Thanks to Via Institute on Character for providing the quiz and Sally Ann Miller for introducing me to this.

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An interview with USA Weekly

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An interview with USA Weekly

Helping others, the trouble with trust, and what to do when you're unfulfilled

This week I was interviewed by USA Weekly! I was pretty excited by this. It's not a huge piece, but USA Weekly is a pretty big deal, and their business section (in which I appeared) is Super Serious And Important.

In the interview I talk about helping others, the trouble with building trust, and what to do when you're in a job that doesn't fulfil you. Check it out here.

Next week I'll be sharing this cool personality quiz I came across. It's useful for identifying your character traits so you can tailor your business (and book) to your strengths. And, y'know, personality quizzes are fun! Sign up below to get it delivered to your inbox.

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How do you work with a ghostwriter?

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How do you work with a ghostwriter?

Let's lift the veil

Ghostwriting is a mysterious world! But we’re lifting the veil and talking about the actual ins and outs of how to work with a ghostwriter to write a non-fiction book for your business. What does the writer do? What do you do? How do you work with a ghostwriter?

 
 

 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that build their businesses.

A story about sloppy joes

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If, like me, you’re not from North America, you might not know what a sloppy joe is. It’s ground beef in a tomato-y sauce, served on a hot dog bun. I think there are different variations, but when I first encountered a sloppy joe, it was with a hot dog bun. 

It was nine years ago. I’d just started dating this cute Canadian guy (who is now my husband) and his parents would have me over for dinner all the time. One night my now mother-in-law made sloppy joes and, being the lovely family they are, they invited me to serve myself first. And I had no idea what to do!

I didn’t know if the beef went on the side, or directly on the bun, and there was cheese—I had no idea where that was supposed to go! And I was confused. And embarrassed to be the weird foreigner who didn’t even know how to put a sloppy joe together.

Now, that’s a bit of a silly example, but it reminds me of how you can feel a bit of an idiot when you don’t really know what the protocol is, what’s expected, or what the “normal way” of doing things is.

Don't worry if you feel like an idiot!

And I think that’s common when people start looking into working with a ghostwriter. They have a sense it could be helpful, but they don’t really know how it works, or what’s expected of them, or what the “normal way” of working with a ghostwriter is. So let’s clear that up.

There are three ways most people work with a ghostwriter.

1. You can have a ghostwriter rewrite your draft

If you’ve written a draft of a book and you look at it and think, This isn’t everything I want it to be, you can hire a ghostwriter to fix it for you. If you know your draft is a mess, and think an editor would have a hard time with it because it doesn’t even really make sense yet, then you can turn that rough draft over to a ghostwriter.

They'll spend time talking with you about what you want to achieve and why you don’t love it. Then they can rewrite the draft to turn it into the book you dreamed of.

2. You can have a ghostwriter create a draft from other content

This is probably more common than the first, and is ideal for those who have a lot of written or video content floating around in various forms. Here, you give the ghostwriter any content you already have, which could include:

  • blog posts,
  • course materials,
  • videos, podcasts, or transcripts of you speaking,
  • lead magnets,
  • worksheets you use with clients, or
  • anything else!

The ghostwriter will interview you and together you’ll work out an outline for the book. The ghostwriter will then go away and write the book, based on the content you’ve shared with them and the interviews.

3. You can have a ghostwriter interview you

This last option is great if you don’t have any written or video content to share, but can talk till the cows come home about your subject! You’ll sit down (in person or virtually) and have a series of interviews with your ghostwriter. They’ll record all the calls, take a ridiculous amount of notes, and write your book from those interviews.

What if you don’t fit neatly into one of these three categories?

Of course, you can combine these three tactics to varying degrees and it’s rarely an all or nothing situation. Most ghostwriters will work with you, wherever you’re at and whatever you’ve got to start with.

Do you have more questions about ghostwriting?

Stick your email address is the space below. You’ll get weekly emails from me where I’ll tackle more common questions about ghostwriting, and I’ll also send you cool stuff I come across about writing your non-fiction book.

And of course, if you have a burning question you want to chat about now, you can always click here to shoot me a message.

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An interview with Fem Founder

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An interview with Fem Founder

Guess who got interviewed this week?

Meeee! The wonderful Kristin from Fem Founder interviewed me this week for her blog, in which she offers up Q&As with female entrepreneurs. Read the interview here.

We cover questions including what inspired me to start my business, what the first steps were that I took in my business, my biggest challenges (where I talk about my son), and my advice for new and aspiring entrepreneurs.

If you're a female entrepreneur, Fem Founder is also worth checking out for their freebie 5 simple secrets to landing top-tier media coverage. Their credits include getting clients featured in Inc.com, Entrepreneur.com, & HuffingtonPost.com, so they know their stuff!

I'll share another video next week (we'll be talking about how to work with a ghostwriter), but in the meantime, if you have a burning question you want to chat about now, click here to shoot me a message.

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What does a ghostwriter do?

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What does a ghostwriter do?

Seriously, what does a ghostwriter actually do?

If you’re looking into writing a non-fiction book, you may have come across the term ghostwriting. It’s pretty common—some research says 50% of best-selling non-fiction books are ghostwritten. But if you’re like most people who aren’t in the industry, you might wonder what a ghostwriter does. We’re going to clear that up!

 
 

 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that build their businesses.

I recently had a call with a parenting coach who wanted to turn her process for working one-on-one with clients into a book. We had a great chat about her business, her audience, some ideas for the book, and how we could use the book to build her business. Then, at the end of the call, I said, "Do you have any questions for me?" And she went a bit bashful, then asked, "What does a ghostwriter actually do?”

And I thought, Oh. I need to explain this better.

So, what does a ghostwriter do?

A ghostwriter is someone who is hired to write on behalf of someone else. 

There are a few different ways that can look. Some ghostwriters write blogs, social media posts, and other online content for businesses or individuals. Some ghostwriters write speeches or video scripts for people. Others write books for people.

Whatever they’re writing, it’s usually because the person they’re writing for falls into one of three categories ...

You might see yourself in one of these descriptions

1. You have something to say but struggle to write it down.

You might be an expert in your field, but not so hot at the writing stuff. You know if you tried to write your ideas down yourself, you wouldn’t do them justice. What’s in your head doesn’t translate onto the page very well.

2. You just don’t like writing.

You might be a decent writer but that blank page intimidates you. Or bores you. Or you just don’t enjoy the process of getting words down on the page, and would rather have someone do it for you. You know the benefits of having a book, but life is too short to do things you don’t love.

3. You don’t have the time to write.

This is true for many of people who are already running busy, successful businesses. Maybe you like writing, maybe you don’t. Maybe you're good at it, or maybe not so much. But it doesn’t matter anyway because you simply don’t have the time to sit down and write. But you know a book would help your business. So, you do the smart thing and get a ghostwriter to help you with it.

So that’s what a ghostwriter does. It’s just a fancy word for someone who writes on behalf of someone else.

Do you have more questions about ghostwriting?

If so, stick your email address in the box below and sign up for emails from me, because I’m going to be answering some more common questions over the coming weeks. We’ll be talking about things like:

  • who gets the credit when you use a ghostwriter,
  • how do ghostwriters get paid, and
  • how do you work with a ghostwriter?

And of course, if you have a burning question you want to chat about now, you can always click here to shoot me a message.

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Writing shouldn’t be so lonely

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Writing shouldn’t be so lonely

Have you tried to write before?

You might have found it a lonely experience. But I recently had a good reminder that, whatever you’re writing, you don’t have to write it alone.

 
 

 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that build their businesses. 

It’s January and I don’t do resolutions exactly, but I do like to decide on a couple of focus points for the new year. 

For 2018, I’ve decided to get back into writing fiction. I have FOUR half-finished novels in my desk drawer. It's pretty shameful for a writer, but I’ve never managed to finish a novel. In fact, last year I hardly wrote any fiction at all. 

This year will be different

But to kick this year off right, I spoke to a couple of amazing editor friends (Leslie Watts from Writership and Anjanette Fennell from Story As Life Literary) about a story idea I’m beating around. 

Now, talking about my story ideas out loud is new for me. Usually I keep them close and don’t talk about them at all. 

I get scared of being laughed at

I suppose I don’t want to be laughed at for an idea that’s only half figured out. I suppose I worry people will roll their eyes and think my ideas are dumb and a waste of time. 

So talking through my fiction story was a big step outside my comfort zone. And, to my surprise, the conversations went really well. Both women I shared with were really encouraging. They helped me figure out some genre and plot stuff I’d been stuck on.

Now, I’m finally making progress on the outline for my story. 

It made me think ...

The experience really made me think about the idea that we don’t have to write on our own. Writing doesn’t have to be such a lonely endeavor. 

It seems a bit obvious when I say it out loud. I mean, that’s what I do as a ghostwriter: I partner up with authors who don’t want to do it alone. And I think it’s a brilliant way to write.

You merge one person’s knowledge and experience and genius with another person’s writing skills and creativity, and you produce something better than you ever could’ve alone

But I’d never thought to apply the same principle to writing fiction. Duh. 

What's this got to do with you?

Now, you might not be writing fiction. You might be working on non-fiction, say, a how-to guide or big idea book. But whatever you’re writing, or thinking about writing, I want to encourage you to find someone to keep you company as you write

It could be your husband or wife. It could be a business accountability partner. It could be a Facebook group in which you post about your progress or challenges. It could even be partnering with a ghostwriter like me!

Share

The important thing is to share your ideas with someone, so it doesn’t become such a lonely practice. 

It can feel scary to put your ideas out there when you’re not even sure if they’re any good. But good things happen when you share. 

Below I'm sharing some links to free Facebook groups where you can find people to keep you company on your writing journey. You can also click here to reach out to me if you want to talk about working on your project together. 

Some resources

Lastly, if you want to get more resources and advice about writing books for your business, put your email in the box below and I’ll send you cool stuff as I come across it. 

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A free resource for overwhelmed entrepreneurs

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A free resource for overwhelmed entrepreneurs

Are you trying to grow your online business?

Do you feel a bit alone, scattered, or overwhelmed? If so, this is for you.

 
 

 

If you’re trying to grow your online business but feel a bit alone, a bit scattered, and overwhelmed, I want to share a free resource with you that’s really helped me recently, because I think it’ll help you too.

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that build their businesses.

It's not a book!

This week, I’m not talking about writing books, because I’m really excited about this free resource that’s been helping me grow my business (it’s not a book!) and since you guys are online entrepreneurs just like me, I want to share it with you.

Introducing ... Jenny Shih

jenny-shih.jpg

A few years ago I discovered a business coach called Jenny Shih. She works with online, service based business owners. I felt drawn to her because she speaks very openly about running a business while she was very, very sick. She had Lyme disease, which just sounds brutal. And it spoke to me because, for four years, I really struggled with a chronic pain condition.

My pain, freelancing, and finding career faith

And that’s why I started freelancing—because suddenly I wasn’t well enough to haul myself into an office every day. I needed flexibility to go to doctor’s appointments and treatments and to work from my bed when I was having a bad day. Jenny Shih gave me faith that I didn’t have to give up on my career dreams just because I didn’t fit into the corporate mold any more.

And now?

Now, my chronic pain is almost completely under control. I still have to be careful about how I live so I don’t tax my body too much, but I’m doing really well. 

And so is Jenny Shih. This fall she launched this free resource for online, service-based entrepreneurs. It’s called Make It Work Online Prep School + Workshop and it’s a free group coaching program on Facebook and email.

Still time to get involved

The prep school part has been going on for a few months and I’ve already got new clients by following her advice in there. The workshop part starts January 16, so there’s still time to get involved. It’s also free. I think it's a lead-in to her upcoming paid program, but don’t let that put you off. Jenny is well known for giving away free content, so I'm confident there’s going to be a ton of benefit to the free workshop.

Click here to request an invite to the group.

Plus, below you can sign up to get more cool stuff to do with writing a book for your business. If you really want to make progress in building your business this year, I encourage you to take advantage of these free resources.

See you in the group!

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You don't have to hustle so hard

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You don't have to hustle so hard

Do you feel like it shouldn't be this hard to win every god damn piece of business?

In this video we’re going to talk about the actual nitty gritty of HOW a book can help you build your business and win over prospects, so you don’t have to hustle so hard every time.

 
 

 

I’m Liz, the ghostwriter behind Green Goose Ghostwriting, where online entrepreneurs get help to write books that build their businesses.

You might have a sense that writing a book will be good for your business.

But how exactly does that work?

You need to be clear on this before you start, so you can turn your book idea into something that really does the hard work of winning prospects over for you.

Now, you can write the book first, then build a business around that book. That’s a totally valid way of doing things. But most of the people I speak to already have an existing business that’s doing okay. So we’re going to cover how a book can help in that situation.

There are three ways a book helps you win business without having to hustle so hard:

1. It helps prospects trust you. 

When we see your name on a book cover, it makes us believe you’re an authority in your niche. This is especially important for people who speak a lot as part of their business model.

2. It gives you a new platform to speak from. 

When you release your book, you have something new to talk about. You have a lead in to approach podcasts, blogs, newscasts, and other platforms, so you can reach new potential clients.

3. It provides a lower-priced entry point. 

Buying your book will be a lot cheaper than working directly with you. This lets potential clients test the waters to see if they like you and what you have to say, before they work directly with you.

Once you have your book available, all three of these elements will work together so that, when it comes time to be on a Skype call with a prospect, or to be pitching them, they’re already sold on the idea of working with you

They will already want what you’re offering, and want you on their side. 

Then the call, the pitch, becomes a formality to iron out the details. And then you don’t have to hustle so hard!

The book has done the heavy lifting for you.

Now, that’s not to say that writing a book isn’t hard. It can feel that way if you’re trying to do it on your own. But you do that work once, and it works over, and over, and over again for you.

We know about passive income in respect to earning you money over and over again, but this is passive hustling: having the book hustle for you again and again.

To recap:

  1. A book helps prospects trust you.
  2. A book gives you a new lead-in to speak to new prospects.
  3. A book is a lower priced entry point for potential clients who aren’t yet sure if they want to commit.

Isn't this a bit basic?

This might sound simple, but it’s important to be clear on these ideas before you start writing your book. This will help you go into the writing stage with clarity and purpose, so you don’t get stuck in the weeds.

Want more?

If you want to hear more about writing a book to build your business so you don’t have to hustle so hard, pop your email in the space below. Whenever I come across cool stuff about writing a non-fiction book, I’ll send it your way.

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