... so you don't waste your time and money

If you’re thinking about writing a book but are worried about wasting your time and money, here are five questions to ask yourself before you start to write.

 
 

I’m Liz, the writer behind Green Goose Ghostwriting. I help entrepreneurs who want to write a book to demonstrate authority in their niche and get more speaking engagements. I write their book in their own voice so they can share their message, inspire others, and finally level-up their business.

I also an entrepreneur and a mother of a 14-month-old boy. And I'm a normal human being in the 21st century, so between work and family and binge-watching episodes of The Crown, I have no spare time whatsoever. My schedule is always full.

Often it’s packed with fun stuff—I just got back from a long visit to family in the UK (which is why I’ve been quiet on here recently). But this means that when I think of a new project I want to pursue, I have to really consider if it’ll be worth the time investment.

If you’re thinking about writing a book, you likely already know it’ll be a big investment. You’ll spend time writing every word, or money to enlist the skills of a ghostwriter.

Asking yourself these five questions before you start writing will help you decide if your book idea is worth the investment, and prevent you from wasting time when you do write your book.

1. Am I really interested in this subject?

Books are big projects and you’re going to invest a lot into this book idea. So are you interested in it enough to sustain you through writing and marketing it?

2. Are others interested in it?

If you’re writing for yourself, that’s totally okay! But if you want your book to level-up your business, you need to consider if there’s an audience for this subject.

3. How will a book fit into my bigger business strategy?

Books don’t usually pay-off in sales alone. But they’re worth it because of how they increase your authority and build your business. So smart entrepreneurs consider strategy up front.

4. Do I want to self-publish or look for a traditional publisher?

We ask this at the beginning because traditional publishers don’t want you to write the book first. They want a proposal. So you need to know if you should be writing your book or a book proposal.

5. Do I want to work alone?

We often think of writing as a solo endeavour, which is great if you like to work alone. But if you’re struggling to write on your own, know that there are several other ways to do it. You just need to choose to pursue them.

I’ll go into more detail about each of these questions over the next few weeks because I know they might’ve triggered even more questions! But for now I want you to encourage you to consider these five questions before you start writing your book, so you don’t waste your time and money.

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See you next time.

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